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:iconb-dedi:
b-Dedi Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2016
MY COOKIE by b-Dedi  :wink by Gomotes
Hey Doug :aww: ! Thanks for the fav and best greetings to Australia !  Tip Hat Emoticon by Gomotes
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:iconpawan-singh:
Pawan-Singh Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2015
thanks for the fav :) (Smile) 
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:iconanna257:
anna257 Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
thank you :)
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you again, Doug, this time for adding my Pencil portrait of Bielka to your favourites.
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you, Doug, for adding my Pencil portrait of Lucille, a Dakota Indian to your favourites.
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Sep 14, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you, Doug, for adding my Pencil portrait of a Himba woman to your favourites.
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:iconcardi777:
cardi777 Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2015
You are totally right about the paper and the eraser pencils - really good result. Easier, and a better outcome
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Glad I could be of help.
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:iconcardi777:
cardi777 Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2015
can i ask one more question - how does one do white streaks in hair? The rubber mainly?
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:iconlatestarter63:
LateStarter63 Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist

There are several techniques for producing fine white, or lighter, lines on a dark background (typically when drawing hair).

You are correct that erasing the line is one of the techniques.  I use a Tombow Mono Ultra-fine 2.5mm round eraser.  This should be kept trimmed with a craft knife to get a clean sharp edge.  You can also, I believe, trim a block eraser to a fine edge and use that, but I have never done this.

I have also used a kneadable eraser pinched into a fine edge.  I keep a selection of balls of kneadable eraser, some are quite soft, being new, and others are stiffer, being older and well-used.  These stiffer ones hold a fine edge better.  This method is more useful for more general highlights, rather than individual hairs.

Another way of producing a really fine white line is to indent the paper with a stylus (I have variously used a wooden point, knitting needle and a ‘dead’ ball-point pen but now use Royal Langnickel embossing tools).  These produce an indentation in the paper that when you shade over it, with the side of a pencil point, the graphite does not get into the indentation.  If it does fill with some dust, you can lift it out with the fine edge of a kneadable eraser.  You can also use a finely pointed hard pencil.  It will leave a pale line, which has the advantage that you can see what you have drawn, but it will never appear white in the drawing!  Whatever you do of course, there is no way to erase a mistake or fill in the indentation!  You could, before you start, lightly sketch where you want the indentations.

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